Insulin Signaling

The Food Pyramid, established by the USDA in 1982, recommended ingestion of 55-70% of calories as carbohydrate. The subsequent 30 years showed a growing epidemic of obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as identifiably increased risks for cancer, arthritis and cardiovascular disease. The Food Pyramid has recently been abandoned. Recommendations for carbohydrate intake now are in the range of 40-55% of total calories. Some propose that we should increase consumption of whole grain foods, natural fruits, etc. Other approaches recommend reducing total carbohydrate consumption further than current recommendations on grounds that 90% of the carbohydrates ingested nowadays are sugars or starches that digest to sugars.These are points of discussion, but regardless of specific dietary recommendations, we believe that a new dietary paradigm can be identified that calls for reducing overall insulin signaling. Benefits include reduced risks for type 2 diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemias, cardiovascular disease, arthritis as well as cancers: in short, many of the chronic diseases of our time.The panel and audience will discuss risk factors for chronic diseases and their inter-relations, mechanisms of insulin signaling that appear likely to contribute to these relationships challenges and possible suggestions toward improving dietary patterns.

Insulin Signaling—Science and Policy [2nd annual Ancestral Health Symposium 2012 (AHS12)] from Ancestral Health Society on Vimeo.

Gary Taubes : Calories vs Carbohydrates

Gary Taubes Calories vs Carbohydrates: Clearing up Confusion over Competing Obesity Paradigms

The science of obesity has been dogged for a century by a controversial question: is the condition an energy balance problem or a hormonal one? Do we accumulate excess fat merely because we consume more calories than we expend — we eat too much and exercise too little — or do we accumulate excess fat because the homeostatic mechanisms regulating fat metabolism and storage are out of whack. If the latter is the case, then positive energy balance (overeating) is an effect of getting fat, not a cause, and the prime environmental suspect for the cause of excess adiposity is the carbohydrate content of the diet and its effect on insulin signaling. This video by author Gary Taubes covers how we might tell these two scenarios apart and potential experiments to resolve this century-old conflict.

FAT Chance with Dr. Robert Lustig

Dr. Robert Lustig presents his New York Times best-seller, FAT Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease. His book illuminates the causes of obesity and challenges the dogma, “a calorie is a calorie.” As our nation becomes wealthier, have we become healthier and wiser?

Dr. Lustig’s book stimulates us to re-evaluate our role as consumers of sugar and shocks us with a sharp bite on the consequences of fructose. As a sugar crusader, Dr. Lustig will talk about the mismatch between our environment and our science, business and politics that has fueled the pandemic of chronic disease over the last three decades. More importantly, he will share strategies to re-adjust key hormones that regulate hunger, reward, and stress. So, take the journey into the biochemistry of your brain and fat cells in order to help you and your family get healthy, no matter your size, in a palatable manner. “Your fat is not your fate — provided you don’t surrender!”

Why Am I Still Fat?

Why do the vast majority of weight loss diets fail? New discoveries are overturning the conventional wisdom that beating obesity is all about eating less and exercising more. Is it because of the so-called famine response? Can obesity be treated as a chronic inflammatory disease? Does chronic exposure to synthetic chemicals in our home environment affect the obesity risk for our kids?

To answer the question – Why am I still fat? – Mark Horstman explores these emerging fields of science, and meets ordinary people in their daily struggle with obesity.

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