The Parallels Between Synthetic Opiates and High Fructose Corn Syrup

High Fructose Corn Syrup and synthetic opiates have many similarities in metabolism, marketing, and impact on the epidemics of obesity and addiction.

Over the last three decades, two health crises have simultaneously overwhelmed modern America: obesity and addiction. The rise of both and a driving factor of each – opioids for addiction, and sugar for obesity – can be traced to two similar inventions, the creation and proliferation of synthetic opiates, and the promulgation of high fructose corn syrup. However, these two products are not only similar in how they have been marketed to consumers, but in how their chemical architecture metabolizes in the human body.

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The Sugar Epidemic Policy versus Politics

Dr. Robert Lustig, Professor of Pediatric Endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco, argues that it is time for a paradigm shift in obesity science and policy, away from personal responsibility and toward public health. His presentation elaborates on his contention that sugar, like alcohol, should not be treated as an ordinary commodity on the open market.

Ketogenic diet is changing the way we think about our health

Sugar. It’s delicious. We snack on it, add it to foods, and don’t even realize that we’re feasting on it daily. While we love sugar-laden foods — bread, pasta, chips, soda, candy, fruit — no one likes what sugar is doing to our bodies.

And among the most vocal critics of sugar is Scottsdale podiatrist Dr. Richard Jacoby, the author of “Sugar Crush,” a book that outlines how sugar is poisoning our bodies and causing inflammatory diseases.

“For years, I’ve been focused on the pathology that sugar creates in the lower extremities,” said Jacoby, who practices at the Scottsdale Neuropathy Institute. “Sugar causes inflammation. And inflammation causes many problems.”

Understanding inflammation

Inflammation is a term used to describe the body’s reaction to something harmful. A rash is an obvious example of inflammation that you can see. But inflammation occurs inside the body — in the joints, in organs, in our nervous system. And when a part of the body becomes inflamed, an illness or disease is the likely result.

The simplest way to identify inflammation is to look for the suffix “itis” in a diagnosis. Hepatitis is inflammation of the liver. Bronchitis is inflammation of the bronchi. Dermatitis is inflammation of the skin.

According to the National Institutes of Health heat, swelling, pain, redness and loss of function are all indicators of inflammation. The bigger issue for physicians like Jacoby is the later results of inflammation: chronic disease, including cancer.

The ketogenic diet

In “Sugar Crush,” Dr. Jacoby recommends trying a ketogenic diet, is a diet that contains very little sugar or carbohydrates and is high in ketomes, which is the byproduct of burning fat. In 1931, Otto Warburg won a Nobel Prize when he proved that fructose causes cancer. Ketomes kill cancer.

For Jacoby, the equation was clear: Sugar causes cancer, ketomes (fats) kill cancer.

“The most important new diet is a diet we were introduced to in the 1930s,” Jacoby said. “You produce ketomes when you eat fat. Cancer cells are killed by ketomes. We’ve known all this stuff for years. Why don’t we know that today?”

And, Jacoby suggests, if a ketogenic diet kills cancer cells, then what else might it cure? He’s had patients who suffer from diabetic neuropathy transition, and remain, on a ketogenic diet, and he’s watched their symptoms disappear.

It’s a diet that Jacoby not only recommends, he also practices it. In “Sugar Crush” Jacoby teaches how to read labels for hidden sugars, and how to eliminate them from your food routine. He knows removing sugar from a diet is difficult, but he also knows the cost of eating sugar is prohibitive.

“Sugar tastes great. You know why? It’s addicting,” he said. “It’s important to know that we as humans should eat fat. It’s the reverse of what we’ve been taught, but the fact is that you can’t get fat — overweight — by eating fat. You do get fat by eating sugars and carbohydrates.”

Reposted from AZCentral

Insulin Signaling

The Food Pyramid, established by the USDA in 1982, recommended ingestion of 55-70% of calories as carbohydrate. The subsequent 30 years showed a growing epidemic of obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as identifiably increased risks for cancer, arthritis and cardiovascular disease. The Food Pyramid has recently been abandoned. Recommendations for carbohydrate intake now are in the range of 40-55% of total calories. Some propose that we should increase consumption of whole grain foods, natural fruits, etc. Other approaches recommend reducing total carbohydrate consumption further than current recommendations on grounds that 90% of the carbohydrates ingested nowadays are sugars or starches that digest to sugars.These are points of discussion, but regardless of specific dietary recommendations, we believe that a new dietary paradigm can be identified that calls for reducing overall insulin signaling. Benefits include reduced risks for type 2 diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemias, cardiovascular disease, arthritis as well as cancers: in short, many of the chronic diseases of our time.The panel and audience will discuss risk factors for chronic diseases and their inter-relations, mechanisms of insulin signaling that appear likely to contribute to these relationships challenges and possible suggestions toward improving dietary patterns.

Insulin Signaling—Science and Policy [2nd annual Ancestral Health Symposium 2012 (AHS12)] from Ancestral Health Society on Vimeo.

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