Does Insulin Resistance Degrade Myelin?

Does Insulin Resistance Degrade Myelin?

Imaging study suggests insulin resistance is linked to loss of myelin

Article on MedPageToday links insulin resistance to loss of myelin, multiple sclerosis and also alzheimer’s.

Demyelination is a known problem in multiple sclerosis, but O’Grady and his team wanted to investigate the relationship between myelination, insulin resistance, and other Alzheimer’s risk factors.

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Multiple Sclerosis & Insulin Resistance Connection – How to correct it – Ayurveda

In this video Nishal Ramnunan, doctor of Ayurvedic medicine, discusses the link between Multiple Sclerosis and Insulin Resistance and how both develop simultaneously as a result of stress.

MS is characterized by an auto-immune reaction that involves the breakdown of Myelin (the insulation around neurons) via the process of neuro-inflammation. Inflammation is caused by several factors, however, the fact that all MS patients tend to also have insulin resistance, gives us the clue that “stress” may play a central role in this disease. On the other hand, insulin resistance may be linked to the development of MS too. Either way, both stress and Insulin resistance should be corrected in order to more effectively treat MS.

Amniotic Fluid Saves Feet

In this interview with video from KSAT news, Dr. Jacoby discusses the breakthrough procedure using amniotic fluid with extremity issues, preventing the need for amputations in diabetics and assisting in the return of sensation and use of limbs. Amniotic fluid from a pregnant donor is injected into or wrapped around the nerve during decompression surgery. The stem cells in the fluid stimulate the affected area, telling it to heal the wound.

As a doctor, what is it like to have to tell someone they’re going to have to get their foot amputated?

Dr. Jacoby: It’s devastating. It’s devastating to tell people who have diabetes, which is the main reason of amputation in the United States, but they have no pain at the end of this process. So, for them it’s not that bad because they don’t have any pain; they just have an infection. They usually become septic so they’re happy to have that leg amputated. The real question is why do they get to that state in the first place? Why didn’t they have early intervention? What we’ve been working on is trying to find out if there is an earlier detection system for people with diabetic neuropathy and diabetes itself.

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