The Parallels Between Synthetic Opiates and High Fructose Corn Syrup

High Fructose Corn Syrup and synthetic opiates have many similarities in metabolism, marketing, and impact on the epidemics of obesity and addiction.

Over the last three decades, two health crises have simultaneously overwhelmed modern America: obesity and addiction. The rise of both and a driving factor of each – opioids for addiction, and sugar for obesity – can be traced to two similar inventions, the creation and proliferation of synthetic opiates, and the promulgation of high fructose corn syrup. However, these two products are not only similar in how they have been marketed to consumers, but in how their chemical architecture metabolizes in the human body.

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How Sugar Fuels the Growth of Cancer

Researchers may be able to explain how sugar might fuel the growth of cancer. They say it boils down to one type of sugar in particular: fructose.  Tests in mice show a possible mechanism for how it happens. The findings, published in the journal Cancer Research, support studies that suggest people who consume more sugar have a higher risk of cancer — especially breast cancer.

The researchers fed mice four different diets that were either heavy in starch or heavy in different types of sugar. What they found is that “Any sugar helped make the tumors grow faster, but fructose did it significantly more. ”

The implications for people are clear. Cohen notes that fructose consumption in the U.S. surged from about half a pound a person a year in 1970 to more than 62 pounds a year in 1997. That’s mainly due to the broad use of high fructose corn syrup.

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45,000 pounds of sugar dumped in Times Square

From USA Today:

Over 45,000 pounds of sugar dumped in Times Square illustrates alarming child health trend

Snack company KIND dumped 45,485 pounds of sugar in Times Square Tuesday to spark conversation about how much added sugar children consume.

The American Heart Association recommends children eat no more than 100 calories (about six teaspoons) of added sugars, also known as free sugars, daily. But, children are eating much more than that — over 270 calories according to data in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Most comes from sweetened drinks.

KIND estimates the average 9-year-old eats their weight in added sugar each year.

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