Industry-Biased Study Questions Validity of Sugar Guidelines

Research spanning many decades shows excess sugar damages your health, yet the sugar industry successfully buried the evidence and misdirected the public with faux science.According to the sugar industry, sugar is harmless and may even be an important part of a healthy diet. To this day, they’re promoting the myth that saturated fat is to blame for weight gain and ill health, not sugar, along with the thoroughly debunked calories-in, calories-out (energy balance) theory.Fortunately, the truth is emerging and taking hold, and some great books have been written exposing the history and extent of the cover-ups.

Source: Industry-Biased Study Questions Validity of Sugar Guidelines

Michael Moss: How the Food Giants Hooked Us

Salt, sugar, and fat: a powerful trio deployed with sophisticated precision by the processed food industry. The result? The average American eats 33 pounds of cheese and 70 pounds of sugar annually, and 8,500 milligrams of salt each day. In industry terms, “mouthfeel” has been perfected and our sugary “bliss points” have been hit. The New York Times investigative reporter Michael Moss sits down with Steve Paikin to talk about his book, “Salt, Sugar, and Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us”.

Don’t scapegoat Big Sugar. Lots of food producers profited from the demonization of fat – LA Times

The recent revelation that Harvard scientists were paid off to downplay sugar’s harms in the 1960s shows how the food industry shockingly manipulated nutrition science for decades. Yet the news media has given the sugar industry too much credit. The real story about how sugar got a pass — while dietary fat and cholesterol were blamed for heart disease — reveals that other industries played a role, as did, surprisingly, many of the country’s leading scientists.

Source: Don’t scapegoat Big Sugar. Lots of food producers profited from the demonization of fat – LA Times

Coke Adds Fraud: Exposing the Beverage Giant’s Shady Research Practices | Alternet

Photo Credit: phloxii/Shutterstock.com

One of America’s once-most-trusted brands funds research downplaying the link between sugary drinks and obesity.

since 2010, Coca-Cola has distributed $120 million to various groups involved in health research and other efforts to combat the obesity epidemic…

Source: Coke Adds Fraud: Exposing the Beverage Giant’s Shady Research Practices | Alternet

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