Glyphosate in Collagen – The Weston A. Price Foundation

Excellent article on the dangers of glyphosate.

Glyphosate is the active ingredient in the pervasive herbicide Roundup®. You are probably familiar with Roundup as a convenient way to control dandelions in your yard and weeds growing in the cracks of your walkways. Monsanto, Roundup’s manufacturer, convinced the U.S. regulatory agencies over four decades ago that glyphosate, despite the fact that it kills all plants except those core crops that have been genetically engineered to resist it, is practically nontoxic to humans.

Because of its perceived nontoxicity, the government has put very little effort into testing residue levels in the foods that we put on our table. The crops that are engineered to resist glyphosate are highly contaminated, because they take up the glyphosate and incorporate it into their own tissues. These include corn, soy, canola, alfalfa and sugar beets. As well, many grains, legumes and other crops are sprayed with glyphosate right before harvest as a desiccant or ripener. These include sugar cane, wheat, barley and oats, among others.

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Glyphosate Pretending to be Glycine

Stephanie Seneff, PhD Senior Research Scientist at MIT has been researching autism for the past 10 years, focusing particularly on environmental toxins’ contribution to autism.

This is a great video for everybody, not just those concerned with autism.  It appears glyphosate contributes to a wide number of diseases that have increased dramatically, including diabetes, obesity, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, ALS, adrenal insufficiency, anemia, spina bifida and of course, autism.  In this talk, Stephanie  presents an amazing story about biochemistry gone awry.

Worth a watch!

 

Brain scans show potential to diagnose autism in infancy

Children with autism tend to be diagnosed around age 4, after a child begins to socialize and speak. But the earlier a child is diagnosed, the better. Early-intervention speech and behavioral therapy programs have shown promise at reducing symptoms. Now, new research shows such a diagnosis could be predicted as early as one year old — based on scans of infants’ brains.

Diagnosing autism very early in a child’s life might mean better interventions and outcomes. On average, children aren’t diagnosed with autism until they are four years old — once their brain has begun to expand, and once they begin behaving differently than neurotypical children — though some are diagnosed as early as their second birthday, Pletcher noted.

“Our findings are pre-symptomatic, certainly pre-consolidation of the diagnosis,” said Dr. Joseph Piven, who leads the eight-center Infant Brain Imaging Study Network, which did the research. “That’s a giant step in the field.”

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