BUY SUGAR CRUSH TODAY!

Get your copy of the book that connects the dots between sugar, carbohydrates, inflammation, nerve damage and a host of other problems that doctors have trouble diagnosing!

David Perlmutter, MD, author of the #1 New York Times Bestseller Grain Brain and Brain Maker

"Sugar Crush brings laser focus to the powerfully detrimental role of sugar and carbohydrates as direct toxins not just to the peripheral nerves, but to the body in general. This is up to date and incredibly well-researched information that helps rewrite our understanding of disease prevention."

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These are the questions we get asked most often

If you're confused about sugar and its role in disease and health, you're not alone. What is most important is that we begin to educate ourselves! Start here, with the questions we get asked most often about sugar, diet, health and disease.

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The Science Is Not Settled

The Nutrition Coalition is a nonprofit advocacy organization working to strengthen national nutrition policy so that it is founded upon a comprehensive body of conclusive science, and where that science is absent, to encourage additional research. Following the research, not the money, to find the truth

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Sugar industry sponsorship of germ-free rodent studies linking sucrose to hyperlipidemia and cancer

Sugar industry sponsorship of germ-free rodent studies linking sucrose to hyperlipidemia and cancer: An historical analysis of internal documents

This paper presents data that suggest that in 1970, the Sugar Research Foundation (SRF) withheld information from the public that the microbiome may be an important contributing factor to sucrose-induced hypertriglyceridemia and that sucrose consumption, compared to starch, might be associated with bladder cancer.

Abstract

In 1965, the Sugar Research Foundation (SRF) secretly funded a review in the New England Journal of Medicine that discounted evidence linking sucrose consumption to blood lipid levels and hence coronary heart disease (CHD). SRF subsequently funded animal research to evaluate sucrose’s CHD risks. The objective of this study was to examine the planning, funding, and internal evaluation of an SRF-funded research project titled “Project 259: Dietary Carbohydrate and Blood Lipids in Germ-Free Rats,” led by Dr. W.F.R. Pover at the University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom, between 1967 and 1971. A narrative case study method was used to assess SRF Project 259 from 1967 to 1971 based on sugar industry internal documents. Project 259 found a statistically significant decrease in serum triglycerides in germ-free rats fed a high sugar diet compared to conventional rats fed a basic PRM diet (a pelleted diet containing cereal meals, soybean meals, whitefish meal, and dried yeast, fortified with a balanced vitamin supplement and trace element mixture). The results suggested to SRF that gut microbiota have a causal role in carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia. A study comparing conventional rats fed a high-sugar diet to those fed a high-starch diet suggested that sucrose consumption might be associated with elevated levels of beta-glucuronidase, an enzyme previously associated with bladder cancer in humans. SRF terminated Project 259 without publishing the results. The sugar industry did not disclose evidence of harm from animal studies that would have (1) strengthened the case that the CHD risk of sucrose is greater than starch and (2) caused sucrose to be scrutinized as a potential carcinogen. The influence of the gut microbiota in the differential effects of sucrose and starch on blood lipids, as well as the influence of carbohydrate quality on beta-glucuronidase and cancer activity, deserve further scrutiny.

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Sugar and cancer: Is there a link?

(CNN)  Does sugar, which makes all things delicious, lead to cancer?

A biologic mechanism in yeast cells may explain the relationship between sugar and malignant tumors, according to a recent study published in the journal Nature Communications.
The nine-year research project may even influence personal medicine and diets for cancer patients, the authors concluded. The study begins by looking closely at cancer cells’ appetite for sugar.

Sugar Beets and MS

Dr Raymond Sobel: investigating links between sugar beets and MS

Dr Raymond Sobel is a neuropathologist working at the VA Palo Alto Hospital in Calfornia, USA. He studies the tissues of the brain, spinal cord, muscle and nerve for diagnostic and research purposes.

Dr Sobel’s research focuses on the effects of a compound found in sugar beets called Azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (Aze). Sugar beets are used in meat and dairy products and their geographical use resembles that of MS incidence. If susceptibility to MS is due at least in part to exposure to a dietary component early in life, this will suggest ways to prevent and perhaps treat MS.

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