Roundup (Glyphosate) and Nerve Damage. – Rainbow Grocery

“The Herbicide Glyphosate Causes Behavioral Changes and Alterations in Dopaminergic Markers in the Male Sprague-Dawley Rat.”

Glyphosate* is a powerful herbicide which has been reported to be neurotoxic. Male rats were injected with glyphosate of 50 mg, 100 mg, or 150 mg over two weeks, and the effect on dopamine neurotransmitter activity was evaluated in the rats to determine the effect on nerve activity. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dopamine Pathways. In the brain, dopamine plays an important role in the regulation of reward and movement. As part of the reward pathway, dopamine is manufactured in nerve cell bodies located within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and is released in the nucleus accumbens and the prefrontal cortex. Its motor functions are linked to a separate pathway, with cell bodies in the substantia nigra that manufacture and release dopamine into the striatum.

CONCLUSION: Glyphosate (as found in Roundup herbicide) alters dopamine neurotransmitter activity of the brains of rats. This is most likely to be true for humans as well. Further testing is needed to see if other neurotransmitters are altered by glyphosate.

Read the article: Roundup (Glyphosate) and Nerve Damage. – Rainbow Grocery

Sugar industry sponsorship of germ-free rodent studies linking sucrose to hyperlipidemia and cancer

Sugar industry sponsorship of germ-free rodent studies linking sucrose to hyperlipidemia and cancer: An historical analysis of internal documents

This paper presents data that suggest that in 1970, the Sugar Research Foundation (SRF) withheld information from the public that the microbiome may be an important contributing factor to sucrose-induced hypertriglyceridemia and that sucrose consumption, compared to starch, might be associated with bladder cancer.

Abstract

In 1965, the Sugar Research Foundation (SRF) secretly funded a review in the New England Journal of Medicine that discounted evidence linking sucrose consumption to blood lipid levels and hence coronary heart disease (CHD). SRF subsequently funded animal research to evaluate sucrose’s CHD risks. The objective of this study was to examine the planning, funding, and internal evaluation of an SRF-funded research project titled “Project 259: Dietary Carbohydrate and Blood Lipids in Germ-Free Rats,” led by Dr. W.F.R. Pover at the University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom, between 1967 and 1971. A narrative case study method was used to assess SRF Project 259 from 1967 to 1971 based on sugar industry internal documents. Project 259 found a statistically significant decrease in serum triglycerides in germ-free rats fed a high sugar diet compared to conventional rats fed a basic PRM diet (a pelleted diet containing cereal meals, soybean meals, whitefish meal, and dried yeast, fortified with a balanced vitamin supplement and trace element mixture). The results suggested to SRF that gut microbiota have a causal role in carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia. A study comparing conventional rats fed a high-sugar diet to those fed a high-starch diet suggested that sucrose consumption might be associated with elevated levels of beta-glucuronidase, an enzyme previously associated with bladder cancer in humans. SRF terminated Project 259 without publishing the results. The sugar industry did not disclose evidence of harm from animal studies that would have (1) strengthened the case that the CHD risk of sucrose is greater than starch and (2) caused sucrose to be scrutinized as a potential carcinogen. The influence of the gut microbiota in the differential effects of sucrose and starch on blood lipids, as well as the influence of carbohydrate quality on beta-glucuronidase and cancer activity, deserve further scrutiny.

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Ketogenic diet is changing the way we think about our health

Sugar. It’s delicious. We snack on it, add it to foods, and don’t even realize that we’re feasting on it daily. While we love sugar-laden foods — bread, pasta, chips, soda, candy, fruit — no one likes what sugar is doing to our bodies.

And among the most vocal critics of sugar is Scottsdale podiatrist Dr. Richard Jacoby, the author of “Sugar Crush,” a book that outlines how sugar is poisoning our bodies and causing inflammatory diseases.

“For years, I’ve been focused on the pathology that sugar creates in the lower extremities,” said Jacoby, who practices at the Scottsdale Neuropathy Institute. “Sugar causes inflammation. And inflammation causes many problems.”

Understanding inflammation

Inflammation is a term used to describe the body’s reaction to something harmful. A rash is an obvious example of inflammation that you can see. But inflammation occurs inside the body — in the joints, in organs, in our nervous system. And when a part of the body becomes inflamed, an illness or disease is the likely result.

The simplest way to identify inflammation is to look for the suffix “itis” in a diagnosis. Hepatitis is inflammation of the liver. Bronchitis is inflammation of the bronchi. Dermatitis is inflammation of the skin.

According to the National Institutes of Health heat, swelling, pain, redness and loss of function are all indicators of inflammation. The bigger issue for physicians like Jacoby is the later results of inflammation: chronic disease, including cancer.

The ketogenic diet

In “Sugar Crush,” Dr. Jacoby recommends trying a ketogenic diet, is a diet that contains very little sugar or carbohydrates and is high in ketomes, which is the byproduct of burning fat. In 1931, Otto Warburg won a Nobel Prize when he proved that fructose causes cancer. Ketomes kill cancer.

For Jacoby, the equation was clear: Sugar causes cancer, ketomes (fats) kill cancer.

“The most important new diet is a diet we were introduced to in the 1930s,” Jacoby said. “You produce ketomes when you eat fat. Cancer cells are killed by ketomes. We’ve known all this stuff for years. Why don’t we know that today?”

And, Jacoby suggests, if a ketogenic diet kills cancer cells, then what else might it cure? He’s had patients who suffer from diabetic neuropathy transition, and remain, on a ketogenic diet, and he’s watched their symptoms disappear.

It’s a diet that Jacoby not only recommends, he also practices it. In “Sugar Crush” Jacoby teaches how to read labels for hidden sugars, and how to eliminate them from your food routine. He knows removing sugar from a diet is difficult, but he also knows the cost of eating sugar is prohibitive.

“Sugar tastes great. You know why? It’s addicting,” he said. “It’s important to know that we as humans should eat fat. It’s the reverse of what we’ve been taught, but the fact is that you can’t get fat — overweight — by eating fat. You do get fat by eating sugars and carbohydrates.”

Reposted from AZCentral

Major science group weighs in on safety of genetically modified foods – CBS News

The National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine concluded Tuesday that tinkering with the genetics of what we eat — adding a gene from another species — doesn’t produce the “Frankenfood” monster some opponents claim it does. But it isn’t feeding the world with substantially increased yields, as proponents predicted.

The authors conclude that there’s “no substantiated evidence that foods from GE [genetically engineered] crops were less safe than foods from non-GE crops,” and that regulators need to make their safety focus more on the end-product of the food that’s made rather than the nuts and bolts of how it’s made.


Source: Major science group weighs in on safety of genetically modified foods – CBS News

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