THE SURPRISING FOOD THAT MAY CAUSE ANGER & AGGRESSION

This is the story of one parent’s quest for the cause of over-the-top anger and aggression.

ODD, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, may sound like every teenager you’ve ever met with symptoms of:

  • anger and irritable mood
  • aggressive
  • argumentative
  • vindictive
  • manipulative
  • lack of respect for authority

But these symptoms were occurring in a 6 year old child.  After eliminating sugar, food coloring and wheat, another devious food culprit was found.  Corn.  And as we know, corn hides under many names, just like sugar.  Read labels, and watch for:

  • dextrin
  • dextrose
  • maltodextrin
  • maltodextrose
  • high fructose corn syrup
  • corn starch
  • modified starch
  • xanthan gum
  • guar gum
  • sorbitol
  • xylitol
  • msg
  • GDL
  • and more!

The good news is, this story has a happy ending.  The symptoms abated with a change in diet.  This is an article well worth reading:

THE SURPRISING FOOD THAT MAY CAUSE ANGER & AGGRESSION: OPPOSITIONAL DEFIANT DISORDER

A Diet for Patients With Chronic Pain

Patients with chronic pain need a high-protein-intake diet, with avoidance of carbohydrate-induced episodes of hypoglycemia and weight gain.

Many serious conditions and diseases, including hyperlipidemia, obesity, congestive heart failure, and renal failure, have their own recommended diet. Considerable scientific information and clinical observation have accumulated in recent years that chronic pain, particularly the debilitating, severe form that requires opioid treatment, needs a “chronic pain” diet. To date, however, no chronic pain diet has been officially recommended. Therefore, the goal of this article is to provide pain practitioners with a pain diet.

The fundamental principle of the diet is that patients with chronic pain need a high-protein–intake diet with avoidance of carbohydrate (sugars and starches)-induced episodes of hypoglycemia and weight gain. It also is intended to promote strength, movement, energy, and mental function. The dietary supplements also recommended are intended to assist regeneration of tissue and prevent osteopenia and osteoporosis.

 The diet recommended here is, with some exceptions, akin to the low-carbohydrate (Atkins) diet that is used in many weight control programs. It does not eliminate carbohydrates but attempts to restrict them by emphasizing protein intake.

The problem with reducing weight in patients with chronic pain is multifaceted. Chances are, patients can’t move or exercise enough to lose much weight. Medication that will relieve pain, whether an opioid, sedative, muscle relaxant, or antidepressant, may suppress the body’s metabolism and cause weight gain. Anorexiants may be of little assistance because the patient with pain may be eating very little. If the protein diet recommended here doesn’t cause weight loss, I recommend adding a stimulant such as phentermine.

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