Pure, White and Deadly – The Man Who Tried to Warn Us

Pure-White-and-Deadly-9780241965283 Pure, White and Deadly by John Yudkin, a book widely derided at the time of publication, has been listed as one of the most coveted out-of-print works in the world, thanks to a ground-breaking lecture called Sugar: the Bitter Truth by Robert Lustig, professor of paediatric endocrinology at the University of California, in which Lustig hailed Yudkin’s work as “prophetic”.

Lustig is one of a growing number of scientists who don’t just believe sugar makes you fat and rots teeth. They’re convinced it’s the cause of several chronic and very common illnesses, including heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s and diabetes. It’s also addictive, since it interferes with our appetites and creates an irresistible urge to eat.

Continue reading …

Is Sugar Toxic?

This NYT Magazine article by Gary Taubes is an excellent read.  It begins by examining Robert Lustig’s accusations that sugar is a toxic poison, but goes on to ask some very important questions about the relationship between sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and obesity, diabetes and cancer. Much needed research may not be forthcoming, however.

As Lustig points out, sugar and high-fructose corn syrup are certainly not “acute toxins” of the kind the F.D.A. typically regulates and the effects of which can be studied over the course of days or months. The question is whether they’re “chronic toxins,” which means “not toxic after one meal, but after 1,000 meals.” This means that what Tappy calls “intervention studies” have to go on for significantly longer than 1,000 meals to be meaningful.

At the moment, the National Institutes of Health are supporting surprisingly few clinical trials related to sugar and high-fructose corn syrup in the U.S. All are small, and none will last more than a few months.

Continue reading …

Butter, red meat not so bad for you after all?

Based on dietary recommendations that were introduced in the US (1977) and in the UK (1983) to (1) reduce overall fat consumption to 30% of total energy intake and (2) reduce saturated fat consumption to 10% of total energy intake, we all jumped on the bandwagon and nixed butter, meat, dairy and cheese, replacing them in our diet with an overabundance of carbohydrates, a practice Nina Teicholz, author of The Big Fat Surprise, says contributed to our current problems with obesity and related health problems.

To support this view, a new report published in the online journal BMJ Open Heart calls that long-standing advice into question. Researchers reviewed and analyzed the clinical trials that were originally used back in the 1970s and 80s as the basis for warnings about dietary fat, and they found that the evidence just didn’t add up.

Continue reading …

 

Translate »