Before you eat your morning Cheerios…

… read this article from The Truth About Cancer website:

Cheerios Nutrition: Is This Popular Food Actually Healthy for Kids & Adults?

Article Summary

  • Cheerios boast that they are made from heart healthy whole grains with no added dyes. Therefore it would be easy to assume that Cheerios are a safe, nutritious choice for breakfast − but are they?
  • Unfortunately, what’s NOT listed or listed accurately on the Cheerios nutrition label is of bigger concern than what’s shown on the label:
    • Acrylamide
    • Sugar sources
    • Emulsifiers
    • Flavor enhancers
    • Inorganic salts
    • Tocopherols
  • The process of toasting the otherwise healthy wholegrain oats produces high levels of the toxic acrylamide. Acrylamide is a carcinogen that is formed when foods containing carbohydrates and sugar are cooked at high temperatures or for an extended period of time.
  • Monoglycerides and diglycerides are used as cheap emulsifiers and for extending the shelf-life of a product. They are hydrogenated oils made up of fatty acids similar to triglycerides (aka trans fats).
  • You may have used Trisodium Phosphate (aka TSP) to wash your walls before painting them, but did you know that this industrial cleaner is also an ingredient in Cheerios? Unbelievably, the FDA permits food manufacturers to use small amounts of TSP in processed foods as a “flavor enhancer.”
  • Most people eat cereal along with milk. Unfortunately, unless it’s organic milk from grass-fed cows, commercial cow’s milk can be tainted with toxic metals, growth hormone, antibiotics, pus from mastitis, GMOs from animal feed, and many more contaminants unfit for human consumption. You’re far better off using nut milks instead.
  • If you don’t know how to pronounce an ingredient on the label it’s likely the product is better left on the shelf. Choose organic whole foods to get the most nutrients for your body and consume them in their natural organic state whenever posible.

The Sugar Epidemic Policy versus Politics

Dr. Robert Lustig, Professor of Pediatric Endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco, argues that it is time for a paradigm shift in obesity science and policy, away from personal responsibility and toward public health. His presentation elaborates on his contention that sugar, like alcohol, should not be treated as an ordinary commodity on the open market.

CDC: Excess sugar increases risk of death

We knew it helped make us fat, but in a study released by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), excess sugar is also blamed for significantly increasing our risk of death from heart disease.

The study focused on refined sugar, which is found in non-diet soda, cakes, cookies and candy.

“The risk of cardiovascular disease death increases exponentially as you increase your consumption of added sugar,” says the study’s lead author, Quanhe Yang, a senior scientist with the CDC.

Continue reading…

Major science group weighs in on safety of genetically modified foods – CBS News

The National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine concluded Tuesday that tinkering with the genetics of what we eat — adding a gene from another species — doesn’t produce the “Frankenfood” monster some opponents claim it does. But it isn’t feeding the world with substantially increased yields, as proponents predicted.

The authors conclude that there’s “no substantiated evidence that foods from GE [genetically engineered] crops were less safe than foods from non-GE crops,” and that regulators need to make their safety focus more on the end-product of the food that’s made rather than the nuts and bolts of how it’s made.


Source: Major science group weighs in on safety of genetically modified foods – CBS News

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