Diet and Chronic Pain: The Paleo Perspective | Paleo Leap

Good article from the paleoleap.com website.

Chronic pain without a visible cause is one of the most mentally difficult chronic health problems to manage, because many people assume that you’re just making it up for attention (especially if you “look healthy” otherwise, as if anyone could tell how healthy someone is by looking at them!). Doctors are sometimes reluctant to prescribe strong painkillers for patients who claim they hurt but don’t have any outer sign to “show for it,” because the doctors are afraid the “pain” could just be an excuse to get prescription drugs. But if you’re like most people suffering from chronic pain, you’re very definitely not making it up, and it doesn’t have to have a visible cause to be “legitimate” pain.

Paleo isn’t a one-size-fits-all solution to chronic pain. If that existed, then chronic pain wouldn’t exist any longer. But there is some evidence to support a Paleo-style diet as a reasonably effective therapy for both pain that isn’t caused by a particular disease and pain secondary to other pathologies, like autoimmune diseases or arthritis.

Continue Reading: Diet and Chronic Pain: The Paleo Perspective | Paleo Leap

Does Exercise Really Make Us Thinner?

The Scientist and the Stairmaster
Why most of us believe that exercise makes us thinner—and why we’re wrong.

This six-part article takes a frank look at the exercise explosion that we Americans bought into, trying to keep from getting fat.  How did we come to believe exercise is the answer, what are the processes involved in exercise that actually work against us, and what does the scientific research show?  “Despite half a century of efforts to prove otherwise, scientists still can’t say that exercise will help keep off the pounds.”

Read the article…

The Sugar Epidemic Policy versus Politics

Dr. Robert Lustig, Professor of Pediatric Endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco, argues that it is time for a paradigm shift in obesity science and policy, away from personal responsibility and toward public health. His presentation elaborates on his contention that sugar, like alcohol, should not be treated as an ordinary commodity on the open market.

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